jameswhitlowdelano @jameswhitlowdelano

jameswhitlowdelano

@jameswhitlowdelano

Reportage & street photog with a Leica. Founder of @everydayclimatechange. Shooting human rights & environmental projects. @pulitzercenter grantee

http://jameswhitlowdelano.photoshelter.com/

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The Americas’ Unconquered Africans:

Pristine Amazonian forest for as far as the eye can see in Suriname's interior. Powerful multinational logging corporations do not view this untouched forest as a treasure trove of bio-diversity, they see easy profits in "green gold" waiting to be exploited.

#suriname #amazonas #rainforest #maroons #geo #geofrance #pulitzercenter #nonfictionphotography

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans: Pristine Amazonian forest for as far ...

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans:

Traveling deep into Saamaka Maroon territory that was, as recently mid-1960's, considered "tjina" (taboo) to White people (according to anthropologist, Richard Price of College of William and Mary, USA) for fear that they would destroy and kill all the Saramaka Maroon people.  To this day, outsiders, Surinamese included, rarely venture this far up the Suriname River into the Amazon rainforest.  Boven Suriname (Upper Suriname River). Suriname. 
The Maroons, a general name derived from the Spanish, "cimarron" used in Hispaniola to refer to escape cattle that took to the hills, are descendents of Africans who escaped slavery on foot centuries ago to live deep in the Amazon much as they had in the rainforests of West Africa.  Maroons refer to themselves as "Busikonde Sembe" or "People of the Bush”. #suriname #maroons #saramaka #saamaka #southamerica #amazonas #freedom #noorderlicht #geo #geofrance #pulitzercenter #nonfictionphotography

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans: Traveling deep into Saamaka Maroon territory ...

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans:

Creole procession through dark streets of central Paramaribo, singing call and response slavery-era folk songs, marking the beginning of Keti Koti ("Cut Chain") Slavery Emancipation day in Suriname.  Paramaribo, Suriname.  Maroon peoples escaped from the chains of slavery in the centuries before emancipation, while their brothers, the Creole, continued to suffer from slavery.

#suriname #slavery #emancipation #KetiKoti #cutchain #noorderlichtphotography #geofrance #geo #paramaribo #nonfictionphotography

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans: Creole procession through dark streets of ...

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans:
The ruins of Marienburg's sugar plantation, founded in 1745 by Maria de la Jaille and finally ceasing operations for good in 1986, which ended the long, often dark, history of plantations of sugar in Suriname.  Suriname, or Dutch Guiana, was first built by African slaves who worked the land without any hope of a better future.  So many Africans escaped bonded labor to try their luck in the jungle interior.  Those people would become the various groups of Maroon peoples; the Ndyuka, Saamaka, Paramaka, Aluku (Boni), Matawai, and Kwinti. 
#suriname #slavery #plantations #marienburg #geo #geofrance #noorderlichtphotography

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans: The ruins of Marienburg's sugar plantation, ...

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans.
Young women out in the main market area in central Paramaribo.  A Creole friend once said that often he could tell the difference between Creole and Maroon women because the Maroon women generally dress hyper-fashionably.  The streets of Paramaribo are a study in fashion creativity.  Suriname.

#suriname #fashion #maroons #unconquered #nonfictionphotography #pulitzercenter #geofrance #geo

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans. Young women out in the main ...

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans:

Creole woman, Mariska Lobo and her son Faiq at her beloved home in central Paramaribo.  Suriname.  Creole people share the history of slavery with the Maroon peoples but the Creole people are more likely to live in the cities, while the Maroon peoples most often inhabit the interior rainforest.

#suriname #paramaribo #geo #geofrance #pulitzercenter #nonfictionphotography

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans: Creole woman, Mariska Lobo and her ...

Although it looks natural, this canal originally excavated by African slaves, that cuts from the Commewijne River  to the Atlantic at Matapica, has been completely reclaimed by the surrounding mangrove forest, and colonized by caimans and other wildlife near Bakkie Plantation.  Commewijne, Suriname.  Canal excavation was considered by slaves the hardest of backbreaking work and led to more slave escapes than other forced labor, leading to the creation of bands of free Africans who later formed various Maroon ethnic groups.

#suriname #slavery #freedom #maroons #unconquered #plantations #dutch #nonfictionphotography #pulitzercenter #geo #geofrance

Although it looks natural, this canal originally excavated by African ...

photo_library Stagnant, fouled pools of water stand beside a gold camp run by Brazilian "garimpeiros" artisanal miners in the deep Amazon in Suriname.  Bensdorp, Suriname. (R) Brazilian “garimpeiros” handmade sluice box used to separate gold from the soil and river stones at the downstream outlet of an artificial pond of foul water.  Brazilian “garimpeiros” are artisanal miners working independently on Maroon land, scouring out entire watersheds, to extract gold from the riverbed using mercury (quicksilver) to enhance recovery of gold.  Large quantities of toxic, mercury is discharged into the watershed, which contaminates fish stocks, poisoning a primary source of protein for the local Maroon population.  In the end what is left is an inorganic poison wasteland where once stood one of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet.  Bensdorp, Suriname

#gold #artisanalminers #amazon #unconquered #garimpeiros #nonfictionphotography #pulitzercenter #geo #geofrance

Stagnant, fouled pools of water stand beside a gold camp ...

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans.

Young woman walking through the market in central Paramaribo.  Suriname.  Maroons and Creoles mix, indistinguishable to the outsider, but the enmity between the two groups remains, dating back to the days when Dutch slave masters would send out patrols of Creoles to recapture escaped slaves before they were able to reach safety in Maroon territory. 
#paramaribo #creole #maroons #suriname #history #unconquered #nonfictionphotography

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans. Young woman walking through the market ...

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans:

Melissa, the daughter of Djumu's headman, atop Pineapple Mountain, a granite dome that, though modest in height, towers over the flat interior rainforests.  Djumu, Suriname.  Pineapple Mountain is named by the local Saamaka Maroon people after the wild growing pineapple plants, the spiky plants at Melissa's feet, that cover the top of the mountain and  promise a reward of sweet fruit after the climb to the top.  Djumu sits on the banks of the upper Suriname River in a sea of largely untouched forest which provides an important source of protein through hunting for bush meat.

#suriname #maroons #saramaka #saamaka #unconquered #amazonas #freedom #nonfictionphotography

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans: Melissa, the daughter of Djumu's headman, ...

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans.
Iwan, a Saamaka Maroon man, stands in front of a massive rainforest tree near Djumu, Suriname.  The Maroon people along the upper Suriname River are effective stewarts of the land they claimed centuries ago after fleeing their Dutch slave masters.  In 1762, the Saamaka signed a treaty with their Dutch colonial master affording them freedom, territory and autonomy.  In the landmark 2007 decision for "Saamaka v Suriname" at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in Costa Rica, the court "guaranteed territorial rights not just for Saamaka, but for all Maroons and indigenous people" in Suriname. In Djumu, Boven Suriname (Upper Suriname River). Suriname.

#suriname #maroons #saramaka #saamaka #unconquered #africans #freedom #rainforest #amazonas #nonfictionphotography #geo #geofrance #pulitzercenter

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans. Iwan, a Saamaka Maroon man, stands ...

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans:

Saamaka Maroon mother with her newborn child in front of her house in Ben Dikonde, near the village of Djumu, Boven Suriname (Upper Suriname River). Suriname.  The Maroons, a general name derived from the Spanish, "cimarron" used in Hispaniola to refer to escape cattle that took to the hills, are descendents of Africans who escaped slavery on foot centuries ago to live deep in the Amazon much as they had in the rainforests of West Africa.  Maroons refer to themselves as "Busikonde Sembe" or "People of the Bush”. #maroons #africans #southamerica #amazonas #unconquered #freedom #motherhood #nonfictionphotography #geo #geofrance #pulitzercenter

The Americas’ Unconquered Africans: Saamaka Maroon mother with her newborn ...

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